#AtoZchallenge V – Vitamin A & C Syrup (make your own)

This syrup is a great way to use these lovely vitamin rich Elderberries after a foraging trip. The syrup is quick and simple to make, it lasts for months in the fridge and has been used traditionally as a cold & flu remedy. Plus it tastes delicious.

Beware – the stalks and leaves of the Elder are toxic, so be careful with the preparation. And it is not recommended to eat them raw.

elderberries

Ingredients

A bowlful of delicious berries stripped from the stalks.

Water to cover the berries in the pan.

450g of sugar for each pint of juice that is produced.

2015-08-14 15.12.48

Instructions

  1. Wash the berries.
  2. Add to a pan and cover with water.
  3. Bring to the boil and simmer for 20 minutes.
  4. Put the mixture through a sieve and discard the seeds and pulp.
  5. Add 450g of sugar for each pint of juice.
  6. Boil this down for about 10 minutes, to thicken the juice.
  7. Bottle and store in the fridge once cooled.

I’ve made this for the last few years, and we’ve used it when we feel sniffy or need a vitamin hit. It’s also very tasty if you just want a spoonful of goodness. Last time I forgot to reduce the mixture over the heat for very long and ended up with a thin syrup. It hasn’t affected the flavour and I’ve found it’s delicious adding a few spoonfuls to hot water. It makes a nice alternative to tea, and it’s hopefully doing a bit of good at the same time.

You can also use it as a Coulis and trickle it over ice cream. Yum!

***

Next time W for Warwick Castle.

Check out other AtoZ posts here.

 

 

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “#AtoZchallenge V – Vitamin A & C Syrup (make your own)

    • Anywhere! They grow in parks, hedgerows and woods. Just don’t pick those too close to a busy road. The trees will be flowering in May and those distinctive black berries follow on a few months later. Think I made my syrup in August last year. You have to get to the berries before the pigeons too!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. They are very common in the UK, but I’m afraid I don’t know how common they are in the rest of the world. They’ve been used for centuries in herbal remedies so there’s nothing to worry about regarding the poisonous stems etc as long as prepared correctly.

    Like

  2. Pingback: #AtoZChallenge X – Xtremely Healthy Lunch | suzanne rogerson fantasy author

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s